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★You Don't Know Beans about Healthy Food!

Hey. This is another one of those threads I’m writing for myself, but maybe you can get some good info for yourself from it. I’ve never been one of those big ‘nutrition’ types, but am being more conscious of what I eat these days. So here is “You Don’t Know Beans about Healthy Food”, or “Jeff’s Health Thread”. (I ain’t no doctor. This is just stuff I got from the web. A lot of it is from Livestrong, Whole Foods and Your Vegan Guide.)

Apparently beans are really good for you, so… (A Bean by Any Other Name)
Adzuke or Oriental Red Beans:
Black Beans – Turtle Beans, Black Spanish, Tampico, Venezuelan:
Black Eyed Peas – Black Eyed Beans, Cowpeas, China Beans:
Broad Beans – Fava, Field Beans, Windsor, Bell Beans, Tic Beans:
Butter Bean – Lima Bean, Fordhook Bean:
Cannellini – White Kidney Beans, Great Northern, Fazolia:
Chickpeas- Garbanzo, Indian Peas, Ceci Beans, Bengal Gram:
English Peas – Sweet Peas:
Green Beans – French Beans, String Beans, Runner Beans:
Kidney Beans – Red Beans:
Lima Beans – Butter Beans, Sugar Beans:
Mung beans – (Also called Green Beans) Mash Beans, Green Gram:
Navy Beans, Boston Beans, Haricot, Boston Pea Beans:
Pinto Beans – Cowboy Beans:
Purple Hull Peas – Cow Peas, Southern Peas, Common Peas:
Soy Beans, Soya Beans:
Split Peas:
Tepary Beans – Pawi, Pavi, Escomite, Yori:
and…
Lentils:

All we have to decide is what to do with the time that is given us.
— Gandalf, J.R.R. Tolkien
I’m Alright
Life Less Ordinary

(I will update this information and clean it up for easier use as I go.)

Red Oriental – Adzouki
Have a sweet and nutty taste

Overview: Adzuki beans, also known as azuki or aduki, are small red beans that are commonly found in eastern Asia. The beans can be used in a variety of recipes or consumed on their own. Although sweetened adzuki beans are often sold in cans, you can also find raw, dry adzuki beans. These beans are quite calorie-dense, so they may not be optimal for dieting.

Calories: Dry adzuki beans are high in calories, as 1 cup provides 648 calories, an amount that comprises more than 32 percent of your total daily calories, based on a 2,000-calorie diet. Dry adzuki beans are much more calorie-dense than other types of beans, such as kidney beans, which contain 174 calories per cup.

Fat: Although dry adzuki beans are high in calories, they are nearly fat-free, as each cup provides just 1 g of fat. Only .4 g of this fat is saturated fat, a type of fat that may increase your cholesterol levels.

Carbohydrates: Dry adzuki beans are high in carbohydrates; with each cup providing 124 g. Carbohydrates provide your body with energy. The 2010 Dietary Guidelines for Americans recommends that carbohydrates make up 45 to 65 percent of your total daily calories. Based on a 2,000-calorie diet, this mean that 900 to 1,300 calories should come from carbohydrates. This translates to 225 to 325 g of carbohydrates a day.

Fiber: Dry adzuki beans are a good source of fiber, as each cup contains 25 g, which is the entire daily recommended intake for women and two-thirds of the suggested intake for men, which is 38 g. Dietary fiber promotes satiety and can help regulate your cholesterol and blood sugar levels.

Protein: Dry adzuki beans can be a good food choice for high-protein diets, as each cup contains 39 g of this nutrient. Your body uses protein to build and repair tissues, cells and hormones.
Minerals and Vitamins: Dry adzuki beans contain a small amount of a wide variety of minerals, including calcium, magnesium and phosphorous. However, 1 cup of these beans contains 2,470 mg of potassium, or about 70 percent of the daily suggested intake. Dry adzuki beans are not a rich source of vitamins, although they do contain folate, or vitamin B-9, and vitamin A.

All we have to decide is what to do with the time that is given us.
— Gandalf, J.R.R. Tolkien
I’m Alright
Life Less Ordinary

Black Beans – Turtle Beans, Black Spanish, Tampico, Venezuelan
Have a mild taste and are used in a variety of ways including black bean soup. These types of beans are also commonly eaten as a Cuban dish of black beans and rice. You can liquidize them and make them into a dip or just have them plain in a salad.

Overview: Black beans are sometimes referred to as turtle beans. This is because they have a dark, shiny, shell-like appearance. The flavor of black beans is similar to the rich flavor of mushrooms. Black beans hold their shape well during cooking.

Nutritional values are based on a 1-cup serving of boiled black beans without added salt.

Basic Nutrition: One cup of black beans contains 227 calories, 40.8g of total carbohydrates and 15g of dietary fiber. Based on a 2,000 calorie-a-day diet, these measurements represent 14 percent of the FDA recommended daily value, or DV, for carbohydrates, and 60 percent for dietary fiber. Black beans also provide 15.2g, or 30 percent DV of protein.

Calories: Total calories for one cup of black beans is 227, or 11 percent DV. Carbohydrates account for the majority of the calories, at 166. Protein makes up 52.9 calories and the remaining calories come from fat.

Fats: The total fat content is 0.9g, which is only 1 percent of the recommended daily value. One serving provides 0.2g of saturated fat and the remaining fat comes from healthy unsaturated fats. You’ll also gain heart-healthy fatty acids of 181mg of omega-3 fatty acids and 217mg of omega-6 fatty acids.

Vitamins: Black beans are an excellent source of folate, with 256 mcg, or 64 percent DV. They also contain 0.4mg of thiamin, which represents 28 percent DV. Other vitamins include riboflavin with 0.1mg, or 6 percent DV; niacin, with 0.9mg, or 4 percent DV; vitamin B6, with 0.1mg, or 6 percent DV; and panthothenic acid, with 0.4mg, or 4 percent DV.

Minerals: One cup of black beans is rich in a number of minerals. It contains 0.8mg of manganese, or 38 percent DV; 120mg of magnesium, or 30 percent DV; 241mg of phosphorus, or 24 percent DV; 3.6mg of iron, or 20 percent DV; 0.4mg of copper, or 18 percent DV; and 610.6mg of potassium, or 17 percent DV. Other minerals found in black beans include calcium and selenium.

Sodium: If the black beans are cooked without added salt they have only 2mg of sodium, which is barely a trace amount. When salt is added, sodium increases to 408mg, or 17 percent of the recommended daily value.

All we have to decide is what to do with the time that is given us.
— Gandalf, J.R.R. Tolkien
I’m Alright
Life Less Ordinary

Black Eyed Peas – Black Eyed Beans, Cowpeas, China Beans
Have a pea like flavor and can be used like any other bean. Try a black eyed bean curry or a black eyed bean casserole. Commonly used in Vietnam as a sweet dessert (with coconut and rice), and in South America black eyed beans are used to make a kind of caviar (with chopped garlic). As with most beans, you can buy black eyed beans uncooked from health food stores, or you can buy them canned.

Overview: Eat them deep fried, cold in a salad, in soup or wrapped in a tortilla. You can even eat them in Texas caviar or a hoppin’ John. Black-eyed beans or black-eyed peas — maybe you even call them cowpeas — can be incorporated into many dishes. Consume these nutritious beans to get a low-calorie source of protein, folate and fiber.

Calories and Fat: The storage and cooking methods determine the nutritional quality of the beans. Recipes vary widely, but the storage method is typically dried or canned beans. According to the U.S. Department of Agriculture, 1 cup of canned beans contains 185 calories, and dried beans contain 198 calories. Both canned and dried beans contain 1 g of fat because the storage method does not affect fat content. Look out for added bacon or flavors that increase fat content in canned beans. Regardless of storage, black-eyed peas are a low-fat food.

Protein: Protein content varies a little between storage methods. Canned black-eyed peas contain 11 g of protein, while cooked dried beans have 13 g of protein per cup. Each person should get 0.8 g protein per kilogram of body weight per day. That means a 130-lb. person should eat 48 g of protein a day. So if you consume 1 cup of black-eyed beans, you will get roughly 25 percent of your protein requirement for the day. Just as important as total protein is the quality of the protein. Black-eyed peas contain all the essential amino acids or protein building blocks for your body. Few non-meat sources provide a complete protein source.

Fiber: Canned beans contain 8 g of fiber, while cooked dried beans have 11 g of fiber per cup. That makes black-eyed peas an excellent source of fiber. Men should consume 38 g and women should get 25 g of fiber daily. One cup of black-eyed beans provides 21 to 44 percent of your daily fiber requirement. Getting enough fiber daily helps protect you against some cancers, reduces your risk of cardiovascular disease and helps maintain proper bowel function.

Foliate: Black-eyed peas contain 90 percent of your daily value of folate. Storage doesn’t affect this nutrient because dried beans and canned beans contain roughly the same amount of folate. Folate is especially important for pregnant women because it is involved in building the genetic material of the baby. Folate also helps maintain healthy red blood cells. Do not overcook black-eyed peas or reheat them many times because folate will be destroyed by prolonged heating.

Sodium: The major difference between canned and dried beans exists in the sodium content. Canned foods require a lot of salt to preserve the food. Specifically, canned black-eyed beans contain 718 mg sodium, while cooked dried beans only have 7 mg per cup. The average adult should consume 1,200 mg of sodium per day. That means if you eat one cup of black-eyed beans from a can, you are consuming 60 percent of the suggested daily intake. Consume nutritious black-eyed beans from a dried source rather than from a can to avoid high intake of sodium.

All we have to decide is what to do with the time that is given us.
— Gandalf, J.R.R. Tolkien
I’m Alright
Life Less Ordinary

Broad Beans – Fava, Field Beans, Windsor, Bell Beans, Tic Beans
Are eaten when they are still young. They have a fresh flavor and a chewy texture and can be used in many recipes and fried as a snack. These types of beans should be shelled before eating as the outer covering has a woody texture which many will find unappealing. You can buy fresh broad beans at the local supermarket and they are also available in cans.

Overview: Fava beans were known in Europe long before they made it to the New World, the National Public Radio website explains. These huge pods were largely eliminated from the European diet when early explorers returned to Europe with with wealth of different beans they found on their travels. Unlike fava beans, these new beans did not require shelling and didn’t require removal of a waxy coating, so they were quite appealing. Since then, fava beans have made a huge comeback — both in Europe and in the U.S., as their pleasant, slightly bitter taste has won them many fans.

Fat and Calories: U.S. Department of Agriculture reports that 1 cup boiled, unsalted fava beans has 187 calories and 0.68g of fat. These numbers suggest that a serving of fava beans are a suitable choice if you’re watching your weight. While 187 calories is slightly high for a side dish of vegetables, these beans provide substantial nutrition.

Protein: One cup of boiled, unsalted fava beans has more protein that their regular green bean counterparts. The USDA reports that this volume of fava beans has 12.92g protein, whereas green beans have 2.86g of protein. This shot of protein makes fava beans a good choice for vegetarians and others trying to boost their protein intake.

Minerals: Fava beans are rich in minerals, with 61mg calcium, 2.55mg iron, 73mg magnesium and 4.4mcg selenium. Although they may have more calories than regular green beans, Fava beans have more of these minerals than the same volume of green beans.

Vitamins: Fava beans are also a rich source of B vitamins, as 1 cup of boiled, unsalted beans comes in with 0.165mg thiamin, 0.151mg riboflavin, 1.209mg niacin, 0.267mg pantothenic acid, 0.122mg vitamin B6 and 177mcg folate. Although they are not a substantial source of vitamins A, C, D or E, 1 cup of fava beans has 4.9mcg of vitamin K, which is essential for blood clotting.

Warning: Patients with advanced kidney disease would be wise to avoid fava beans until they consult their nephrologist or renal dietician. Like other legumes, favas are high in potassium and phosphorus. A 1-cup serving of boiled fava beans has 456mg of potassium and 212mg of phosphorus. These amounts could be dangerous for people whose kidneys do not properly filter these minerals.

All we have to decide is what to do with the time that is given us.
— Gandalf, J.R.R. Tolkien
I’m Alright
Life Less Ordinary

Butter Bean – Lima Bean, Fordhook Bean

Overview: Butter beans, also known as lima beans, get their nickname from their buttery taste. While in some kid circles, lima beans are a notorious “ick” food, many people like the beans’ creamy texture and light flavor notes. The beans pack a fiber-rich, nutrient-dense punch while offering a reasonable choice to those watching their calories and carbohydrates. In season, look for shell-able butter beans in the produce aisle. The legumes are available dried or canned throughout the year.

Overall Nutrition: MayoClinic.com suggests making butter beans and other legumes a staple food for a healthy diet. As a group, legumes can substitute for meat because they contribute protein, vitamins, minerals and beneficial fats without adding cholesterol or fat. The nonprofit nutritional website World’s Healthiest Foods rates the butter bean a “fiber all star” because of its high content of dietary fiber, which helps stabilize blood sugar and regulate digestion. The bean’s high fiber content, along with its high content of magnesium and folate, additionally contributes to a heart-healthy diet, according to the website. It also provides more than 1/4 of your daily iron needs, an important consideration for women and for anyone at risk of anemia. It’s also a source of protein and antioxidants.

Calories, Fat and Sodium: A 1-cup serving of butter beans contains 216 calories and less than 1g fat. For an unprocessed food, butter beans are somewhat high in sodium. The serving adds 147mg, or almost 19 percent, of your suggested daily income of sodium. Don’t add salt to butter bean dishes.

Protein,Carbohydrates and Fiber: A single serving of butter beans provides almost 1/2 of your dietary fiber and 1/3 of your protein needs for the day. Yet the beans have a relatively modest carbohydrate count. The beans contain 14.7g protein, 39.2g carbs and 13.2g dietary fiber.

Vitamins and Minerals: At about 1mg manganese per serving, butter beans contribute almost 1/2 of your daily requirement of the mineral. It also rated by World’s Healthiest Foods as a source of iron, copper, folate, phosphorus, thiamin and magnesium.

Additional Benefits: At 141mcg of the trace mineral molybdenum, butter beans provide 86 percent of the recommended amount of the often-overlooked nutrients. For people who are sensitive to sulfites in processed foods, eating molybdenum-rich foods may help counteract the effects of sulfites, which can include headaches, dizziness and rapid heartbeat. Molybdenum neutralizes sulfites in your system.

Uses: Consider replacing pureed garbanzo beans with butter beans in bean spreads. The pureed or mashed beans also make a protein-rich stuffing for vegetarian burritos and enchiladas. Use butter beans in stews, soups and casseroles, or as a side dish. Cookbook author Didi Emmons suggests making “lima minestrone” with butter beans, corn and sweet red peppers. Of course, the classic butter-bean dish, succotash, never goes out of style. Mix the beans with corn to create the classic Native American food.

Considerations: People prone to gout should avoid butter beans. The food is moderately high in a substance known as purine. Purines, even at high levels, are harmless to most people. But for people whose kidneys have trouble breaking down uric acid, high-purine foods can exacerbate the problem, leading to the painful condition known as gout. Other high-purine foods include organ meats, roe, shellfish, game meats, lentils, sardines and anchovies. (I believe, this is me, Jeff talking – there is new information about this that contradicts some of this stuff.)

All we have to decide is what to do with the time that is given us.
— Gandalf, J.R.R. Tolkien
I’m Alright
Life Less Ordinary

White Kidney Beans – Great Northern, Cannellini Beans, Fazolia
Are large white beans which are popular in Italy. They have a smooth texture and a nutlike flavor. These bean types can be bought either dried or in tins at supermarkets or health food shops. They are used in a variety of ways and can be used in salads, stews, soups and other dishes. Cannellini beans are a staple ingredient in MINESTRONE SOUP.

Overview: White kidney beans are also known as cannellini beans or fazolia beans. They are available dry or canned and are featured in traditional Italian recipes. White kidney beans are nutritionally rich foods. These beans are high in protein, complex carbohydrates and fiber, yet low in fat. White kidney beans are packed with minerals and B vitamins.

Serving Information: Dried beans swell to over twice their volume when cooked. A pound of dried kidney beans is about 2 cups of beans, which will yield 4 or 5 cups of cooked beans. A serving of 238 g or 8.39 oz. of cooked white kidney beans contains 200 calories.

Carbohydrates, Fat and Protein: White kidney beans are low in fat and high in carbohydrates and protein. A 238 g serving of white kidney beans contains 1.4 g of fat or 2 percent of the recommended daily value for fat. White kidney beans contain no trans fat or cholesterol. A-200 calorie serving has 0.4 g of saturated fat, 0.75 g of polyunsaturated fat and 1.09 g of monounsaturated fat. A serving contains 34.5 g of carbohydrates, which is 11.5 percent of the daily value for carbohydrates. Sugars account for 4.4 g of the total carbohydrates. A 200-calorie serving contains 12.42 g of protein or 25 percent of the daily value. Beans are an excellent source of dietary fiber. One-half cup of cooked or canned kidney beans contains 9.7 g of fiber.

Vitamins and Minerals: A 228 g serving of cooked white kidney beans offers 704 mg or 29.4 percent of the daily value for sodium, 15.5 percent of the daily value for iron and 8.1 percent for calcium. The serving also contains 564 mg of potassium, 214 mg of phosphorus, 64 mg of magnesium and trace amounts of other minerals including zinc, copper, selenium and molybdenum. One serving of white kidney beans contains 4.8 percent of the daily value for vitamin C. Beans are also a good source of B vitamins including folate, niacin, pantothenic acid and thiamin.

Health Risk from Undercooked Beans: Cooked white kidney beans are a nutritious food, but soaked raw or undercooked beans present a health risk. Kidney beans contain high levels of a chemical called phytohaemagglutinin, which causes a form of food poisoning characterized by nausea, vomiting and diarrhea. According to the FDA, white kidney beans contain about one-third the levels of hemagglutinin found in red kidney beans, but still enough to pose a concern. It is recommended that raw beans be boiled at least 10 minutes prior to consumption. Heating the beans to 176 degrees F actually worsens the toxicity five-fold, so reaching and maintaining a boiling temperature of 200 degrees F is important.

White kidney beans are aprotein-rich starchy vegetable, full of vitamins, minerals and an excellent source of dietary fiber. Adding them to your diet offers a variety of health benefits, such as promoting digestive health and preventing heart disease. White kidney beans are large and squared at the edges, unlike smaller white beans, such as navy beans. Fiber Benefits: Kidney beans, like other beans and legumes, are rich in both types of dietary fiber; soluble and insoluble. A 1 cup serving of kidney beans, cooked, meets roughly 45 percent of the Recommended Daily Intake for fiber. Both forms of fiber offer health benefits. In the digestive tract, soluble fiber forms a gel-like substance that binds with cholesterol-containing bile and carries it out of the body. Insoluble fiber, on the other hand, helps to prevent constipation and improves laxation by increasing stool bulk. Insoluble fiber may also help to prevent common digestive disorders such as diverticulosis and irritable bowel syndrome. Reduces Heart Attack: Fiber-rich diets help promote healthy cholesterol levels and lower cholesterol. White kidney beans are also rich in a B vitamin known as folate. In fact, a 1 cup serving of cooked white kidney beans meets over half of the Recommended Daily Value or DV for this nutrient. Folate helps lower levels of homocysteine. Homocysteine is an amino acid that acts as a toxin in the bloodstream. In fact, elevated levels of this amino acid in the bloodstream is an independent risk factor for stroke and heart attack. According to a meta-analysis published in the “Journal of the American Medical Association” in October 2002, if all Americans consumed folate-rich diets, or those that met 100 percent of the DV for this nutrient, it would reduce the number of heart attacks by 10 to 11 percent each year due to the reduction in circulating homocysteine. Stabilizes Blood Sugar: In addition to offering benefits for the digestive and cardiovascular systems, the soluble fiber found in white kidney beans helps stabilize blood sugar levels. According to an article published in “Current Diabetes Reports” in October 2009, randomized, controlled research studies have shown that viscous soluble fiber offers both immediate and long-term metabolic improvements in individuals with type 2 diabetes. Some of these benefits include reducing hemoglobin A1c levels and insulin levels, improving fasting and post-meal glucose readings and aiding in weight control by promoting feelings of fullness.

All we have to decide is what to do with the time that is given us.
— Gandalf, J.R.R. Tolkien
I’m Alright
Life Less Ordinary

Chickpeas- Garbanzo, Indian Peas, Ceci Beans, Bengal Gram
Have a mild nut like taste and a soft texture. They are commonly used to make houmus but can be used in currys and soups like most other beans. Buy them dried and cook them yourself or canned. They are also ground into a flour (called gram flour) and used to make falafels. A versatile legume that provide high amounts of fiber and protein. A staple of Indian and Middle Eastern cuisine, garbanzo beans can stand in for animal sources of protein to make vegetarian meals. Garbanzo beans are available dry or canned and make a nutritious addition to any diet.
Overview: Garbanzo beans, also called chickpeas, are cooked fresh, roasted, boiled or mashed, and served in savory and sweet dishes, particularly in Mediterranean, Middle Eastern and Indian cuisine. Garbanzos are higher in fat than other beans, delivering more calories per serving.

Calories: According to the U.S. Department of Agriculture, a 1-cup serving of garbanzo beans contains 295 calories, total. Approximately 200 calories come from carbohydrates alone, while proteins provide 50 calories and fats deliver around 45 calories. Garbanzo beans provide 12 g of fiber per cup, which helps with digestive health. You also get 15 g of protein in one serving.

Contents: The USDA also indicates that a 1-cup serving of garbanzo beans weighs around 164 g. Of that amount, 50 g are carbohydrates. Proteins deliver around 14 g and fats provide about 5 g. The remaining portion consists of fiber, water and other nutrients.

Caloric Value: Almost 15 percent of the daily recommended caloric intake for the average adult can be provided in a 1-cup serving of garbanzo beans. A 2,000-calorie-per-day diet is used to determine the percentage.

Nutrients: Garbanzo beans are a source of several vitamins including vitamin C, B6 and folate. Many dietary minerals are also available from garbanzo beans, including manganese, phosphorus, copper, iron, magnesium, selenium, zinc and calcium.

Vitamins and Minerals: Garbanzo beans contain 10 vitamins. The 1-cup serving offers 8 percent of the recommended dietary allowance for vitamin K, 1 percent for vitamin A, 4 percent for vitamin C and 3 percent for the antioxidant vitamin E, based on a 2,000-calorie diet. Garbanzo beans provide many of the B vitamins, with 13 percent of the RDA for thiamin, 11 percent for vitamin B6, 4 percent for niacin, 6 percent for riboflavin and 5 percent for pantothenic acid. They also contain 71 percent of the RDA for folate. Folate is intrinsic to the development of red blood cells and helps reduce the risk of certain birth defects during fetal development. One cup of garbanzo beans provides 26 percent of the RDA for iron. It also offers 8 percent of the RDA for calcium, 20 percent for magnesium, 28 percent for phosphorus, 29 percent for copper, 9 percent for selenium and 14 percent for potassium. Garbanzo beans have 84 percent of the RDA for manganese per cup. This mineral acts as an antioxidant and is essential to the metabolism of macronutrients, bone development and wound healing.

Considerations: Canned garbanzo beans are a quick alternative to reconstituting dried. Some brands have upward of 700 mg of sodium per cup versus 70 mg in dried. To keep sodium under control, rinse the beans in a colander before using.

Uses: Garbanzo beans are a staple in many Indian curries. For a quick version, saute onions and garlic in a small amount of canola oil. Add cooked garbanzos, a can of diced tomatoes and garam masala to taste. Season with salt and black pepper and sprinkle with chopped cilantro before serving over rice. Use garbanzos as the base of hummus, tossed into a green salad or as part of a three-bean salad. Roast olive oil-coated, cooked chickpeas in a 350 degree Fahrenheit oven until crunchy and sprinkle with chili powder and salt for a snack.

All we have to decide is what to do with the time that is given us.
— Gandalf, J.R.R. Tolkien
I’m Alright
Life Less Ordinary

English Peas – Sweet Peas

Overview: While there are many types of peas, the variety commonly sold as peas in grocery stores is called English peas. Peas grow in cooler seasons, as the plants are resistant to frost. While most people typically eat both the pod and seed of sugar snap and snow peas, only the seeds of English peas are usually eaten.

Calories and Fat: One cup of cooked green peas contains 134 calories that come from 73 percent carbohydrates, 26 percent protein and 1 percent fat. Like most vegetables, peas are very low in fat, with only .4 g per serving. However, if you add 1 tbsp. of butter to your peas, you add 11.5 g of fat and 102 calories.

Protein: Cooked peas are higher in protein than most vegetables. One cup of peas contains 8.6 g of protein, which is 19 percent of the recommended daily amount for women and 15 percent for men. By contrast, 1 cup of corn contains 4.5 g, 1 cup of green beans contains 2.4 g and 1 cup of carrots contains only 1.3 g. Like almost all plant foods, peas do not provide a complete protein, as they are missing one or more of the essential amino acids that must be obtained elsewhere through the diet. However, if you eat meat or dairy products with peas, they provide a complete protein.

Fiber: Cooked peas are also higher in fiber than many other vegetables. One cup of peas contains 25 g of carbohydrates, 8.8 g of which are fiber. This is more than twice as much fiber as corn or green peas, each of which contain 4 g of fiber per cup. The 8.8 g of fiber in peas provides 31 percent of the recommended daily amount for most adults, which is 28 grams.

Minerals: Cooked peas contain large amounts of numerous minerals, including iron. One cup contains 2.5 g of iron, which is 31 percent of the recommended amount for men and 14 percent for women. Iron is necessary for the production of hemoglobin, which carries oxygen throughout your body. One cup of peas also provides 22 percent of the recommended daily amount of potassium, 31 percent of copper and 37 percent of manganese.

Vitamins: Cooked peas contain many vitamins, including both fat-soluble and water-soluble types. One cup provides more than 25 percent of the recommended amount of vitamin C and more than 30 percent of vitamin K. Vitamin K is essential for proper blood clotting. Peas are also high in almost every B vitamin, with 1 cup providing more than 20 percent of folate, B-6, thiamin and niacin.

All we have to decide is what to do with the time that is given us.
— Gandalf, J.R.R. Tolkien
I’m Alright
Life Less Ordinary

Green Beans – French Beans, String Beans, Runner Beans
Are picked when they are immature and are one of the few bean types that can be eaten fresh. Commonly used as an ingredient in Salad Nicoise, green beans can be used and eaten like most other vegetables. You can buy green beans fresh, frozen or canned.

Overview: String beans, also known as green beans, are fiber-rich vegetables that are low in calories and have minimal fat. These vegetables provide carbohydrates and protein. Whether fresh, frozen or canned, the nutritional content is similar. String beans, also known as green beans or snap beans, aren’t always green — and modern varieties don’t even contain strings. String beans represent a low-calorie, vitamin-rich side dish which can be served hot or cold, fresh or cooked.

Calories: Each cup of string beans contains 34 calories. Because of the low calorie count, string beans may be appropriate for dieting. You could burn off more than four cups of green beans by walking for one hour at a 2-mph pace. A serving of 1 cup of cooked, plain green beans contains 44 calories, according to the U. S. Department of Agriculture’s Nutrient Database, while the University of Maine Cooperative Extension program estimates that 1 cup of raw green beans contains 31 calories.

Fat: Like most vegetables, string beans are naturally low in fat. A cup of string beans contains about 0.1 g of fat. Because fat contains nine calories per gram, this means 1 cup of string bean contains less than one calorie from fat.

Carbohydrates: The main source of calories in string beans is carbohydrates — this nutrient group provides 77 percent of the calories in the vegetable. Each cup contains about 8 g of carbohydrates, with nearly 4 g of fiber. Dietary fiber may help reduce your risk of diabetes and decrease your cholesterol levels.

Protein: Although most of the calories in string beans come from carbohydrates, they also contain protein. Each cup of string beans contains 2 g of protein.

Vitamins and Minerals: String beans contain a significant quantity of vitamin C. A 1-cup serving provides 30 percent of the recommended daily allowance as well as 4 percent of the recommendation for calcium and 6 percent of that for iron. They are also a good source for vitamin A. They also provide dietary fiber and folate.

Healthy Serving Suggestions: To keep the calorie, sodium and saturated fat content of green beans low, serve lightly-steamed green beans with a splash of lemon and olive oil rather than salt, butter or sour cream. The extension program’s recipe for a vinaigrette-style green beans dish uses 2 tbsp. each lemon juice, vinegar and mustard, as well as 1 tbsp. olive oil, for every 2 pounds of green beans. The serving, equivalent to about 1 ½ cups, contains 97 calories.

All we have to decide is what to do with the time that is given us.
— Gandalf, J.R.R. Tolkien
I’m Alright
Life Less Ordinary

Kidney Beans – Red Beans
Commonly used in chilli recipes and can be bought either dried or in cans. You can also fill tacos with red kidney beans in place of non vegan ingredients. Another common use for these types of beans is a three bean salad. Red kidney beans are good used in any recipe where the beans are allowed to soak up the flavors, such as a curries and stews.

Overview: Kidney beans are dark red, kidney-shaped beans available in dried or canned form. Because they hold their form well when you cook them, they are a favorite ingredient for soups and salads. The flavor of the beans is relatively bland, so they absorb the flavors of spices added to the preparation. Kidney beans contain many vitamins and minerals, and are high in and fiber. For people looking to boost their intake of healthy proteins, kidney beans make an excellent choice. One serving provides almost a third of your daily protein needs. Additionally, at 225 calories per serving, kidney beans contribute no dietary cholesterol and less than 1 g fat and 3.5 g sodium. The same 1-cup serving provides almost half of your dietary fiber needs for the day, as well as folate, manganese, thiamine, copper, potassium, magnesium, iron and biotin. One of the most versatile beans, kidney beans get their name for their distinctive shape and can be distinguished by their rich red color. They are ideally cooked in soups and stews, though they are also frequently used in salads. They are high in fiber, which may help lower cholesterol, and are almost completely fat-free. In addition to these health benefits, kidney beans are also rich in various vitamins and minerals, including manganese, iron and potassium

Major Nutrients: One cup of cooked kidney beans contains 225 calories. They provide just 1 g of fat and 40 g of carbohydrates. The total protein content of kidney beans is 15 g per cup, but they lack the optimal ratios of amino acids to be considered a “complete” source. Many people eat them with rice with rice or another grain to create a more complete protein dish. At 15.3 g per cup, kidney beans provide about 30.7 percent, or almost a third, of the recommended daily allowance of protein, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s nutrient database for protein.

Fiber: Kidney beans provide 11 g of fiber per cup. The Institute of Medicine recommends that most adult women take in 25 g of fiber daily and that men take in 38 g of fiber daily. Fiber helps regulate digestion, lower cholesterol levels and promote colon health, according to the Harvard School of Public Health.

Additional Nutritional Benefits: Kidney beans offer 177 percent of the daily recommended allowance, or RDA, for molybdenum. Molybdenum helps the body process compounds known as sulfites, which are used as a food preservative, according to The World’s Healthiest Foods. Kidney beans also provide 57 percent of the RDA for folate, 56 percent of the amino acid tryptophan, 42 percent of RDA for manganese, 29 percent of iron, 25 percent of phosphorus, 21 percent of copper, 20 percent of potassium, 20 percent of magnesium and almost 19 percent of thiamin and vitamin K.

Considerations: Kidney beans, like other legumes, contain a complex sugar called raffinose. Some sensitive individuals have trouble digesting this sugar and experience gas and bloating after its consumption. Your health care provider may recommend over-the-counter digestive enzymes if you complain of digestive discomfort following the consumption of beans or other foods.

Caution: Raw kidney beans are potentially toxic. They contain phytohemagglutinin, a substance that, when consumed in high amounts, can negatively affect cell activity. When cooked, the concentration of this compound reduces significantly enough to pose no health risk.

Comparisons to Other Foods: Red and white meats tend to yield the highest amount of protein, notes the nonprofit website World’s Healthiest Foods, or WHFoods.org. One serving of venison, yellow fin tuna, chicken breast, turkey breast, halibut or lamb contributes between 60 to 70 percent of the protein RDA. Of the plant-based foods, cooked soybeans provide the highest amount of protein, at 29 g, or or 57 percent RDA. Other legumes, including kidney beans, are also rated as good sources of the nutrient. Legumes are good protein sources for vegetarians and vegans, as well as for people watching their fat and cholesterol. Kidney beans have about the same amount of protein as black beans, chickpeas, cow peas, lentils, pinto beans great northern beans and navy beans, according to the USDA.

Importance of Protein: A nutrient found throughout your body, protein is crucial for building muscle and tissue and producing red blood cells. The various amino acids in proteins help maintain organs, bones and healthy blood. People who are dieting may experience greater success lowering their carbohydrate count and raising their intake of protein, according to Donald K. Layman, P.H.D., in “Protein Quantity and Quality at Levels Above the RDA Improves Adult Weight Loss,” published in the “Journal of the American College of Nutrition.”

Complete vs. Incomplete Proteins: Dairy and meat proteins contain the kind of proteins known as complete, because they contain all nine essential amino acids making up protein, Pairing legumes with complex carbohydrates generally makes up for any components missing from plant-based proteins, notes KidsHealth,org. For example, pair cooked kidney beans with brown rice or whole-grain tortillas, or spread pureed kidney beans on whole-grain crackers, slice bread or pita bread.

Recommended Daily Protein Intake: Adults need .4 g of protein for every pound they weigh, which translates into a RDA of 48 g for a 120-pound person or 64 g for a 160-pound person. Kids should eat .5 g for every pound they weight— a recommendation with easier math, since parents need only divide their child’s weight in half to get the optimum protein amounts. For instance, a 60-pound child should eat 30 g protein each day, For a child, a cup of cooked kidney beans might represent as much as half her daily protein needs, while for an average woman or man the kidney bean serving yields between a third and a fourth of their protein RDA.
.Manganese: With 42 percent of the recommended daily value of manganese, kidney beans are one of the most important natural sources of this trace mineral. Manganese helps perform a variety of duties in the body, including acting as a co-factor in energy production and the defense of antioxidants.
Iron: One cup of kidney beans provides a valuable 29.8 percent of your daily iron allowance. Iron transports oxygen from the lungs and distributes it throughout the rest of the body via red blood cells. It also plays an important role in metabolism and producing energy. Pregnant women, adolescents and growing children may all have an increased need for iron and may want to add more kidney beans to their diets.

Copper: Copper is the third most common mineral in the body, much of which is concentrated in the brain and liver. It helps boost energy production and assists antioxidants in the fight against free radicals, possibly preventing cancer. One cup of kidney beans provides 25 percent of your recomended daily allowance of this important mineral.

Phosphorus: Most of the phosphorus found in the body joins with calcium in the bones to form calcium phosphate. This is a vital mineral that is also a primary part of cell membranes and helps activate B-vitamins. In kidney beans, you can take in up to 27 percent of your daily allowance of phosphorus in just one cup.

Potassium: Potassium, found in significant quantities in kidney beans, helps reduce blood pressure and aid with heart function. Potassium deficiency can lead to fatigue and weakness, and consuming potassium-rich foods such as kidney beans, which contain 23 percent of your daily recommended allowance in one cup, can ensure you get enough of this mineral to stay healthy.

All we have to decide is what to do with the time that is given us.
— Gandalf, J.R.R. Tolkien
I’m Alright
Life Less Ordinary

Lima Beans – Butter Beans, Sugar Beans have a starchy smooth flavor and can be purchased either dried or in tins. These types of beans can be eaten like most other beans – pop them into stews and soups or have them in salads.

Overview: Lima beans are a high-fiber, low-fat source of protein and minerals. While 1 cup provides more than 20 percent of the dietary reference intake, or DRI, for protein and more than 30 percent for fiber, it contains less than 1g of fat. One cup of boiled, unsalted lima beans also supplies more than 90 percent of the DRI for manganese for adults over age 50. Native to South America, the mildly flavored lima bean offers energizing complex carbohydrates, protein, iron, B vitamins and other essential nutrients. The starches and fiber in lima beans create a feeling of fullness, which may help to curb your hunger if you’re trying to lose weight. Whether you eat lima beans as a low-fat source of protein or as a high-fiber vegetable, you can benefit from the abundance of nutrients in these legumes.
Calories: One cup of boiled lima beans contains 209 calories, most of which come from carbohydrates, particularly fiber. One cup of lima beans contains 40.2g of carbohydrates and 9g of fiber. This is 32 percent of the dietary reference intake, or DRI, for fiber. Lima beans are low in sugar, with 1 cup containing only 2.8g.

Protein: One cup of lima beans contains 11.6g of protein, which accounts for 46 of the 209 calories per cup. These 11.6g provide 25 percent of the DRI of 46g for women. The DRI for men is higher, at 56g, so 1 cup provides only 21 percent of the DRI for men. Although lima beans are not a complete protein because they lack some of the essential amino acids, they do provide large amounts of some of the non-essential amino acids such as aspartic acid and glutamic acid.

Fat: Lima beans are low in fat. One cup contains only .5g, which accounts for less than 9 of the 209 calories per serving. Lima beans contain no cholesterol.

Minerals: Like many beans, lima beans provide large amounts of many essential minerals. In particular, 1 cup of lima beans supplies more than 50 percent of the DRI for iron for men. Because women require more than twice as much iron as men, 1 cup supplies only 22 percent of the DRI for women. Women require less magnesium than men, however, so while 1 cup of lima beans provides 39 percent of magnesium of the DRI for women, it provides only 30 percent for men. One cup of lima beans also supplies over 100 percent of the DRI for manganese for women and 93 percent for men. One cup supplies 32 percent of the DRI for phosphorus, 48 percent for potassium and 58 percent for copper as well.

Vitamins: Lima beans supply both water-soluble and fat-soluble vitamins. One cup provides more than 18 percent of the DRI for vitamin C, as well as more than 19 percent of thiamin, more than 12 percent of riboflavin and more than 10 percent of niacin. One cup also supplies 25 percent of the DRI for vitamin B6. While most of the fat-soluble vitamins are present in trace amounts, 1 cup of lima beans does supply 9 percent of the DRI for men and 12 percent for women.

Digestive Health: One cup of lima beans has 13 g of fiber, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture, or USDA. Fiber is a plant material that your body can’t digest; however, this nutrient plays a vital role in healthy digestion by facilitating the movement of wastes through your intestinal tract. By regulating your bowel activity, the fiber in lima beans prevents constipation, hemorrhoids and other gastrointestinal complications. Lima beans are rich in soluble fiber, a form of fiber that may help lower your cholesterol levels. The Institute of Medicine, or IOM, recommends that men between the ages of 19 and 50 get 38 g of fiber each day, and that women in this age group get 25 g daily.

Tissue Development: In order to form new tissues and repair damaged ones, your body needs protein from foods such as beans, meat, poultry, fish or eggs. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, men over age 18 should have about 56 g of protein daily, and women over 18 should have 46 g each day. The amino acids in protein make up the structures of your cells, tissues and organs. Because beans do not provide a full complement of essential amino acids, you must eat other protein-based foods during the day to meet your daily protein requirements. Combining lima beans with rice, fish or skinless chicken will give you a low-fat, low-calorie meal that offers a full complement of amino acids. One cup of lima beans provides 15 g of protein, with 216 calories and 1 g of fat, according to the USDA.

Metabolic Function: Lima beans are rich in several essential vitamins and minerals that your body requires to metabolize nutrients and produce energy. Lima beans contain the B vitamins folate and thiamine, which participate in metabolic activity and promote healthy blood formation. Lima beans are a rich source of iron, which is vital for energy production and oxygen usage. Lima beans are also an excellent source of manganese, a trace element that activates several of the enzymes involved in metabolism. One cup of lima beans provides 1 mg of manganese, 4.5 mg of iron, 156 mcg of folate and 0.3 mg of thiamine, according to the USDA.

Cardiovascular Health: One cup of lima beans offers 955 mg of potassium, a mineral and electrolyte that helps to maintain a normal fluid balance in your body. Potassium supports your cardiovascular health by reducing your sensitivity to sodium, regulating blood pressure and lowering your risk of stroke. The adequate intake for potassium is 4,700 mg each day for men and women, according to the IOM. Lima beans contain niacin, a B vitamin that contributes to the health of your heart by supporting blood circulation and controlling cholesterol levels.

All we have to decide is what to do with the time that is given us.
— Gandalf, J.R.R. Tolkien
I’m Alright
Life Less Ordinary

Mung beans – (Also called Green Beans) Mash Beans, Green Gram
Commonly used in Chinese, Thai, Japanese, Korean, Pakistan, Indian, and Southeast Asian cooking. Mung beans are also commonly sprouted and called bean sprouts. They are sweet flavored and are delicious cooked with spices and seasonings. You can buy mung beans either dry or tinned from Indian groceries or health food shops.

Overview: The mung bean is not a widely known legume in the United States. Most Americans are more familiar with its sprouts, which are commonly found in salads. As with many legumes, the mung bean has many nutritious properties. They can be used in a variety of recipes, including soups and stews. The mung bean is a small green type of legume which has a variety of essential nutrients to offer. Mung beans can be sprouted and eaten raw or cooked and served in casseroles or stews. According to the USDA National Nutrient Database, which provides a full nutrient profile, 1 cup of cooked mung beans has 212 calories. The mung bean is a small green type of legume which has a variety of essential nutrients to offer. Mung beans can be sprouted and eaten raw or cooked and served in casseroles or stews. According to the USDA National Nutrient Database, which provides a full nutrient profile, 1 cup of cooked mung beans has 212 calories.

Calories: A 1-cup serving of boiled mung beans has 212 calories. If you eat 2,000 calories a day, a serving of the beans equals 10.6 percent of your total daily calories.

Fat: As with nearly all legumes, mung beans contain only a small amount of fat: 0.77 g in one cup, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture. If you eat a 2,000-calorie diet, you should consume no more than 65 g of fat per day, the USDA advises. Diets high in fat — particularly trans fat and saturated fat — increase your risk for obesity and related health conditions.

Sodium: A 1-cup serving of boiled mung beans contains only scant sodium, about 4 mg. Adding salt to the boiling water or salting the beans to taste will significantly alter your sodium intake. A quarter teaspoon of salt contains 590 mg of sodium. You should restrict daily sodium intake to no more than 2,400 mg to help protect against hypertension, the USDA recommends in its Dietary Guidelines for Americans.

Carbohydrates: Plant-based foods are often a good dietary source of carbohydrates because at least part of the carbs come in the form of dietary fiber. In the case of mung beans, a 1-cup serving contains 38.68 g of total carbs, and 15.4 g of the carbs are dietary fiber, according to the USDA. The beans also contain some carbohydrates in the form of sugars: 4.04 g per cup.

Protein: All legumes are a dietary source of protein. In the case of mung beans, you will get 14.18 g of protein for every 1 cup of the boiled beans you eat, according to the USDA. Protein makes up virtually every cell, tissue and organ in your body. In order to maintain and repair organs and tissues, you need a supply of protein in your diet. One cup of cooked green mung beans provides 14.2 g of protein. The daily amount of protein recommended by the Institute of Medicine is 46 g for women and 56 g for men.

Vitamins and Minerals: Mung beans contain varying amounts vitamins and minerals essential to a healthy diet. Among the vitamins in the beans are vitamin A, vitamin C, vitamin B6, and the B vitamins folate, niacin, riboflavin and thiamin, according to the USDA. Minerals present in the beans include phosphorus, potassium, magnesium, calcium and iron.

Fiber: Green mung beans are a very good source of dietary fiber. Dietary fiber promotes heart health, helps control blood glucose and insulin concentrations and promotes a healthy gastrointestinal tract. One cup of cooked green mung beans has 15.4 g of dietary fiber. Men should consume 38 g of dietary fiber daily and women should consume 25 g as recommended by the Institute of Medicine.

Iron: Iron is an important component of hemoglobin, a protein found in red blood cells responsible for carrying oxygen to organs and tissues. There are 2.83 mg of iron in a 1 cup serving of cooked green mung beans. The Institute of Medicine recommends women consume 18 mg of iron daily and men consume 8 mg.

Folate: Mung beans are rich in the B vitamin, or folate. Folate is essential for proper growth and development and for the production of red blood cells. A 1 cup serving of cooked green mung beans provides 321 mcg of folate. Adults need 400 mcg of folate daily, as recommended by the Institute of Medicine. It is important for women of childbearing age to consume adequate folate to reduce the risk of birth defects.

Zinc: Zinc is necessary for immune function, wound healing and for the synthesis of protein and DNA. A 1 cup serving of cooked green mung beans supplies 1.7 mg of zinc. According to the Institute of Medicine, men need 11 mg of zinc daily and women need 8 mg. Zinc is also necessary for sense of taste and smell.

All we have to decide is what to do with the time that is given us.
— Gandalf, J.R.R. Tolkien
I’m Alright
Life Less Ordinary

Navy Beans, Boston Beans, Haricot, Boston Pea Beans
A pale whitish bean with a mild flavor. Commonly used in American cuisine (Boston baked beans for example), they can also be used in soups, stews and most other recipes which call for a bean type. Like most beans, they are available dried and canned.

Overview: Navy beans, like many dried beans, are an excellent source of protein, minerals and B vitamins. Numbers below are for 1 cup of cooked, unsalted beans. While the sodium content would rise significantly if salt were added during cooking, most other numbers would stay the same. Dietary reference intake (DRI) percentages are for adults under age 50.

Calories: One cup of cooked navy beans contains 255 calories. While beans are high in protein, the majority of the calories do still come from carbohydrates. One cup contains 47.4 g of carbohydrates and less than 1 g of sugar. Navy beans contain a large amount of both starch and fiber. One cup provides 28 g of starch and 19.1 g of fiber. This is nearly 70 percent of the DRI for fiber for an adult consuming 2,000 calories a day.
Protein: Along with the 47.4 g of carbohydrates in a cup of navy beans, there are also 15 g of protein. While this protein is comprised of significant amounts of 18 different amino acids, navy beans are still not a complete protein, as they do not contain all of the essential amino acids.

Fat: While high in both carbohydrates and protein, navy beans are low in fat, with 1 cup containing only 1.1 g. This fat is a combination of trace amounts of saturated, polyunsaturated and monounsaturated fats. One cup of beans contains no cholesterol or trans fats.

Sodium: Navy beans on their own contain no sodium so 1 cup of beans would contain 0 mg. However, most beans are boiled with salt, which would increase the sodium content significantly. Adding just 1/4 tsp. of salt to the beans would increase the sodium to 581 mg, which is nearly 25 percent of the recommended daily maximum of 2,400 mg.

Minerals: Navy beans contain significant amounts of many essential minerals. One cup contains 53 percent of the DRI for manganese for women and 42 percent for men. One cup provides 42 percent of the DRI for copper as well. Copper is an important nutrient for the metabolism of iron. One cup of navy beans also supplies over 30 percent of the DRI for both phosphorus and potassium, as well as approximately 20 percent of the DRI for zinc and 10 percent of the DRI for selenium and calcium. Lastly, 1 cup of navy beans supplies 30 percent of the DRI for magnesium for women and 23 percent for men.

Vitamins: Although 1 cup contains only 2 percent of the DRI for vitamin C, navy beans do provide large amounts of many other water-soluble vitamins. One cup supplies 64 percent of the DRI for folate, which helps prevent certain types of anemia. One cup also provides nearly 40 percent of the DRI for thiamine and 20 percent of the DRI for both B-6 and choline. Approximately 10 percent of the DRI for riboflavin, niacin and pantothenic acid are provided by 1 cup as well. Navy beans contain less than 1 percent of the fat-soluble vitamins A, E, K and D.

Fiber: One cup of cooked beans contains 19.1 g of fiber. This is 68 percent of the DRI for an adult consuming 2,000 calories per day. This fiber is soluble fiber, which can help lower cholesterol. Beans are also low in fat (1.13 g) and contain no cholesterol, making them an excellent choice for people on low cholesterol diets.

Protein: One cup of navy beans supplies 15 g of protein, made up of all of the essential amino acids except taurine. Because they are missing this essential amino acid, navy beans are not a complete protein. They can, however, be consumed with rice or corn to make a complete protein. One cup of beans provides more than 5 percent of all three branched chain amino acids (isoleucine, leucine and valine), which are thought to relieve stress.
Minerals: Navy beans are an excellent source of many minerals. One cup provides more than 40 percent of the DRI for both copper and manganese. Copper is important for iron metabolism, while manganese is important for bone formation. One cup also supplies 37 percent of the DRI for phosphorus and 35 percent for potassium. For women, 1 cup provides 24 percent of the DRI for iron, 23 percent for zinc and 30 percent for magnesium. For men, 1 cup provides 54 percent of the DRI for iron, 17 percent for zinc and 23 percent for magnesium.

Vitamins: Navy beans contain nearly all of the B vitamins. One cup provides 64 percent of the DRI for folate and more than 30 percent of the DRI for thiamin. Folate is used for the metabolism of protein and can prevent certain types of anemia. Thiamine is important for both carbohydrate and protein metabolism. One cup of navy beans also supplies more than 15 percent of the DRI for vitamin B6 and choline as well as smaller amounts of riboflavin, niacin and pantothenic acid.

All we have to decide is what to do with the time that is given us.
— Gandalf, J.R.R. Tolkien
I’m Alright
Life Less Ordinary

Pinto Beans – Cowboy Beans
Have a unique mottled skin (pinto in Spanish means “painted”) and are commonly used as a filling for burritos and served alongside rice or mashed into refried beans. You can also use them in place of kidney beans in chili recipes. You can buy these types of beans in most health food shops and some supermarkets in either dried or tinned form.

Overview: Pinto beans are the mature seeds of a type of legume. Usually preserved by drying or canning, pinto beans resemble kidney beans in size and shape but are tan with streaks of reddish brown, which disappear as the beans cook. A nutritious food, pinto beans are high in protein and carbohydrates and low in fat. They also provide a significant amount of certain vitamins and minerals and are high in dietary fiber.

Contents: The USDA Nutrient Database indicates that a typical serving of 1 cup of boiled pinto beans weighs 171 g. Carbohydrates make up around 45 g of that weight. Proteins provide 15 g and only 1 g comes from fats.

Caloric Value: A 1-cup serving of pinto beans provides around 245 calories, or approximately 12 percent of the daily recommended caloric intake for the average adult. Carbohydrates provide 182 calories per serving. Proteins deliver approximately 53 calories, and fat comes in at around 10 calories.

Vitamins: Pinto beans contain substantial amounts of certain essential vitamins. The highest of these is folate at almost 300 mcg or 75 percent of the daily recommended intake for this vitamin. Other high concentrations of vitamins include thiamine at 0.3 mg or 25 percent, and vitamin B-6 at 0.4 mg or around 30 percent. Lesser amounts of other vitamins within the serving are vitamin C, vitamin E, vitamin K, riboflavin, niacin and pantothenic acid.

Minerals: A single serving of pinto beans is also an excellent source of many essential dietary minerals. Manganese at 0.8 mg or 40 percent has the highest level. Other significant quantities of minerals within the serving include iron at 3.6 mg or 36 percent, phosphorus at 250 mg or 35 percent, magnesium at 86 mg or 23 percent, and potassium at 746 mg or 16 percent. A single serving also has substantial amounts of calcium, zinc, copper and selenium.

Other Nutrients: Pinto beans are naturally low in sodium, providing just 1.7 mg, or less than 1 percent of the total amount recommended each day within each serving. The same amount delivers a substantial quantity of dietary fiber at 15 g, or more than 60 percent of the recommended amount. Pinto beans contain no appreciable amounts of saturated fats, trans fats or cholesterol.

All we have to decide is what to do with the time that is given us.
— Gandalf, J.R.R. Tolkien
I’m Alright
Life Less Ordinary

Purple Hull Peas – Cow Peas, Southern Peas, Common Peas

Overview: Purple hull peas are a type of peas related to black-eyed peas that are rich in fiber and fat-free. If you’re athletic, purple hull peas can be beneficial, as they are also rich in carbohydrates. While purple hull peas do provide some nutritional benefits, they’re not ideal for all diet plans and contain few vitamins and minerals. Purple hull peas are sold frozen, canned and fresh.

Calories: Purple hull peas are relatively low in calories, as a half-cup contains 90. This amount comprises 4.5 percent of the daily recommended intake of 2,000. Because they are low in calories, purple hull peas can be suitable for dieting. You could burn the calories in the half-cup of purple hull peas through about nine minutes of jogging.

Carbohydrates: Purple hull peas are primarily a source of carbohydrates, as each half-cup serving contains 19 g. This is 3 g more carbohydrates than a half-cup of black-eyed peas contains. Carbohydrates are your body’s primary energy source, so purple hull peas can aid in your athletic efforts.

Fiber: Purple hull peas are high in dietary fiber, with 5 g in each half-cup serving. Dietary fiber is an essential nutrient that can help you manage your cholesterol levels and can aid in dieting, as it promotes feelings of fullness.

Protein: Purple hull peas are rich in protein, with each half-cup supplying 6 g, as much as one egg provides. Protein is essential for building muscle, and increasing your protein intake may also aid in weight loss.

Vitamins and Minerals: Purple hill peas aren’t rich in vitamins and minerals, but each half-cup does contain 10 percent of the daily recommended intake of iron and 2 percent of the recommended daily intake of calcium.

All we have to decide is what to do with the time that is given us.
— Gandalf, J.R.R. Tolkien
I’m Alright
Life Less Ordinary

Soy Beans, Soya Beans
Have a chewy nutlike taste and are amazingly versatile. These types of beans are made into many different foods such as soya milk, soya cheese, soya yoghurts and soya cream. A popular bean type choice for vegetarians and vegans, soya beans are also a complete protein, containing all the essential amino acids. Soya beans can be bought either dried or canned and can be added to soups and stews like other beans.

Overview: Soybeans were first cultivated by the Chinese in 1100 B.C., according to the North Carolina Soybean Producers Association. By the first century A.D., soybeans were being grown in several parts of the world. While Asian communities believed the soybean to be a miracle food, it wasn’t until 1904 that its protein and fat value was discovered. Soybeans are a a source of high-quality protein, healthy fat and vitamin E. Soybean farmers in 29 states plant, harvest and sell their soybean crops. Most soybeans grow in the Midwest. It is a relatively easy crop to grow and used in a variety of ways — from food for animals and people to fuel for vehicles. If you are interested in including more soy into your diet, understanding the nutritional value and varied uses for this simple bean may help.

Calories: Soybeans come in a variety of types, including green, mature and roasted, and the calorie content of each type varies. A 100-g portion of cooked mature soybeans contains 173 calories. A 100-g serving of cooked green soybeans, also known as edamame, contains 141 calories. A 100-g portion of roasted soybeans contains 471 calories.

Fat: Each 100-g serving of cooked mature soybeans contains 9 g of total fat, 1.3 g of saturated fat, 1.9 g of monounsaturated fat and 5 g of polyunsaturated fat. A 100-g portion of cooked green soybeans contains 6.4 g of total fat, 0.7 g of saturated fat, 1.2 g of monounsaturated fat and 3.0 g of polyunsaturated fat. A 100-g portion of roasted soybeans contains 25 g of total fat, 3.6 g of saturated fat, 5.6 g of monounsaturated fat and 14 g of polyunsaturated fat. The American Heart Association recommends you limit your fat intake to 25 to 35 percent of calories, and saturated fat to less than 7 percent of calories. Most of your fat choices should come from the more heart-healthy monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats.

Carbohydrates: Each 100-g serving of cooked mature soybeans contains 10 g of carbohydrates and 6 g of fiber. Each 100-g serving of cooked green soybeans contains 11 g of carbohydrates and 4 g of fiber. A 100-g portion of roasted soybeans contains 34 g of carbohydrates and 18 g of fiber. A balanced diet should provide 45 to 65 percent of its calories from carbohydrates, according to the McKinley Health Center. Carbohydrates are your body’s primary source of energy. Including foods high in fiber in your diet can help alleviate constipation and lower blood cholesterol levels. Women need 21 to 25 g of fiber a day, and men need 30 to 38 g.

Protein: A 100-g serving of cooked mature soybeans contains 9 g of protein. A 100-g serving of cooked green soybeans contains 12 g of protein. A 100-g portion of roasted soybeans contains 35 g of protein. The quality of protein found in the soybean is similar to the protein found in meat and eggs. Healthy adult men need 56 g of protein a day, and healthy adult women need 46 g.

Nutritional Information: Even though the soybean is a plant, the soybean has all nine of the essential amino acids your body requires, making it a complete protein. A cup of boiled, green soybeans has 22.23 g of protein, 254 calories, 103 of which are from fat. The cup of green soybeans also has 7.6 g of fiber, 4.5 mg of iron, small amounts of sodium, thiamin, riboflavin and niacin. Soybean curd, or tofu has 340 calories in 1 cup. The curd contains 28.12 g of protein, 18.23 g of fat and 12.6 mg of iron. Although high in fat, the fat in the beans comes from healthier monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats.

Soy Products: Soybeans can be ground into flour, pressed for oil, roasted for desserts and crackers, used as snacks, processed into biodiesel fuels and fed to animals. If you read the ingredient list of many processed foods you will see soybean oil listed in foods such as cookies, coffee creamers, margarines, some medications, dressings for salads and mayonnaise. Tofu, soy milk and cheese, texturized vegetable protein and soy butter are other products made from soy.

Soybeans in the Diet:Soy is an excellent source of protein for vegetarians and vegans, who eat no meat. Vegans who do not eat any animal products, such as cheese or milk from cows, can enjoy soy milk and cheese as healthy substitutes. If you are trying to limit the amount of beef you eat, substitute seasoned textured vegetable protein for ground beef in tacos, chili or hamburgers. Mix boiled, softened green soybeans with brown rice for a healthy dinner. Use soy butter rather than regular butter, and eat roasted soybeans as a snack. Dry roasted soybeans have 194 calories per 1/4 cup, and 17.02 g of protein.

Health Benefits: Unless you have an allergy to soybeans, eating soybeans may help you in several ways. MedlinePlus indicates that eating about 25 g of soy a day may reduce your risk of developing heart disease. If you are a woman of menopausal age, eating soy may help reduce your incidence of hot flashes associated with menopause. Due to the filling nature of the soybeans, you may find you are able to control your caloric intake more easily when you eat the soybeans as a snack or as part of a meal.

All we have to decide is what to do with the time that is given us.
— Gandalf, J.R.R. Tolkien
I’m Alright
Life Less Ordinary

Split Peas

Overview: A split pea is a variety of the dried pea, which comes as either whole or split. These peas are usually deep green in color, but can also be a yellow color. Split peas are a member of the legume family and are a good source of cholesterol-lowering fiber. Nutritional values are based on a one cup serving of boiled split peas without added salt. Green and yellow split peas are different varieties of the seeds of the Pisum sativum L., or field pea, plant. Belonging to the legume family, this plant is found throughout the world, with the world’s top producers being Russia, China, India, Canada and the United States. Due to the plant’s versatility and near universality, split peas are found in the traditional dishes of a variety of cultures around the world.

Basic Nutrition: One cup of boiled split peas contains 231 calories, 41.4g of total carbohydrates and 16.3g of dietary fiber. Based on a 2,000 calorie-a-day diet, these measurements represent 14 percent of the recommended daily value, or DV, for carbohydrates and a large 65 percent for dietary fiber. Split peas also have 16.3g, or 33 percent DV, of protein. Nutritional Value: Split peas are highly nutritious, with both yellow and green split peas providing a variety of micro and macronutrients. A one cup serving of cooked split peas contains 231 calories, with almost no fat content at 0.8 g. Split peas are very high in protein, with one serving containing 16.4 g. Though relatively high in carbohydrates at 40 g per serving, 16.3 g of this is dietary fiber with only 5.7 g of sugar. Aside from their high protein and fiber content, split peas are a great source of a number of other nutrients. One cup of split peas provides 196 percent of your recommended daily intake, or RDI, of molybdenum, 56.3 percent of your RDI of tryptophan, 39 percent of your manganese, 31.8 percent of your RDI of folate, 24.7 percent of your thiamine, 20.3 percent of your potassium and 19.4 percent of your RDI of phosphorous. In addition to these high micronutrient values, one serving of split peas is an excellent source of 11 amino acids and provides between 10 and 20 percent of your RDI of magnesium, iron, zinc and copper.

Calories: The 231 calories in one cup of split peas is primarily from carbohydrates, which account for 168 calories. Protein contributes to 56.7 calories and the remaining calories come from fat.
Fats: The total fat content is 0.8g, which represents only 1 percent of the recommended daily value. One serving contains 0.1g of saturated fat, and the remaining comes from unsaturated fats. You’ll gain minimal heart-healthy fatty acids of 54.9mg of omega-3s and 269mg of omega-6s.
Vitamins: Split peas are an excellent source of folate, with 127mcg, or 32 percent DV; thiamin, with 0.4mg, or 25 percent DV; pantothenic acid, with 1.2mg, or 12 percent DV; and vitamin K, with 9.8mcg, or 12 percent DV. Other vitamins include vitamin A, vitamin C, riboflavin, niacin and vitamin B-6.

Minerals: Split peas are a rich source of manganese with 0.8mg, or 39 percent DV; potassium, with 710mg, or 20 percent DV; phosphorus, with 194mg, or 19 percent DV; magnesium, with 70.6mg, or 18 percent DV; and copper, with 0.4mg, or 18 percent DV. Other minerals include calcium, iron, zinc and selenium.
Sodium: If the split peas are cooked without salt, they have only 4mg of sodium, which is barely a trace amount. When salt is added, sodium increases to 466mg, or 19 percent of the recommended daily value.

History: Pisum sativum L. is one of the oldest crops cultivated by human beings. A native of the Fertile Crescent, this Southwest Asian crop still grows wild in Iran, Ethiopia and Afghanistan. Domesticated before 6000 B.C.E., Pisum sativum L. spread east to China and west through the Mediterranean and across Europe, with evidence of field peas in Switzerland dating back to 3000 B.C.E. The gathering of wild, whole peas for use in food may predate the plant’s domestication, with peas carbon dated to 9750 B.C.E. found in an ancient settlement in Southeast Asia. Despite its long history in the diets of the ancient Roman, Greek, Babylonian, Persian and Egyptian civilizations, the use of split peas arose thousands of years after the plant’s domestication.
Splitting Process:Evidence of split pea soup dates back to 500 B.C.E. in the Greek and Roman civilizations, with its growing popularity leading to a mention in Aristophenes’ play “The Birds” from 414 B.C.E. A mechanical process, splitting the dry seeds of the Pisum sativum L. plant first involves husking, or dehulling, the seeds. This removal of the outer coating of the seed allows for easy division of the pea into its two cotyledons, the parts of the seed that eventually develop into leaves. This removal of the husk and splitting of the pea results in a sweeter, less starchy, earthier taste, softer texture and shorter required cooking time than for whole peas.

Green vs. Yellow Split Peas: Barbara Kneen of Cornell University and various others identified the genetics of Pisum sativum L. over a number of studies through the 1980s and 1990s. In a 1994 study, Kneen and her colleagues found that the color of the seeds of Pisum sativum L. is coded for by a specific genetic locus. Due to the specificity of this gene, the color of split peas is not associated with many major differences. Both have similar flavors, nutritional content and cooking time, though yellow split peas tend to have a milder flavor than their slightly sweeter, green counterparts.

All we have to decide is what to do with the time that is given us.
— Gandalf, J.R.R. Tolkien
I’m Alright
Life Less Ordinary

Tepary Beans – Pawi, Pavi, Escomite, Yori
Have a deep earthy taste and are a staple of Native Americans in the Southwest. These beans take longer to cook than the average bean types but you can use them like other beans in various recipes. Rarely found in cans, tepary beans can be found in some health food shops but are not as available as other types of beans.

(Couldn’t find much info on this one.)

All we have to decide is what to do with the time that is given us.
— Gandalf, J.R.R. Tolkien
I’m Alright
Life Less Ordinary

Lentils
Compared to other types of dried beans, lentils are relatively quick and easy to prepare. They readily absorb a variety of wonderful flavors from other foods and seasonings, are high in nutritional value and are available throughout the year.

Lentils are legumes along with other types of beans. They grow in pods that contain either one or two lentil seeds that are round, oval or heart-shaped disks and are oftentimes smaller than the tip of a pencil eraser. They may be sold whole or split into halves with the brown and green varieties being the best at retaining their shape after cooking.

Health Benefits
Lentils, a small but nutritionally mighty member of the legume family, are a very good source of cholesterol-lowering fiber. Not only do lentils help lower cholesterol, they are of special benefit in managing blood-sugar disorders since their high fiber content prevents blood sugar levels from rising rapidly after a meal. But this is far from all lentils have to offer. Lentils also provide good to excellent amounts of six important minerals, two B-vitamins, and protein—all with virtually no fat. The calorie cost of all this nutrition? Just 230 calories for a whole cup of cooked lentils. This tiny nutritional giant fills you up—not out.

Lentils—A Fiber All Star
Check a chart of the fiber content in foods; you’ll see legumes leading the pack. Lentils, like other beans, are rich in dietary fiber, both the soluble and insoluble type. Soluble fiber forms a gel-like substance in the digestive tract that snares bile (which contains cholesterol)and ferries it out of the body. Research studies have shown that insoluble fiber not only helps to increase stool bulk and prevent constipation, but also helps prevent digestive disorders like irritable bowel syndrome and diverticulosis.

Love Your Heart—Eat Lentils
In a study that examined food intake patterns and risk of death from coronary heart disease, researchers followed more than 16,000 middle-aged men in the U.S., Finland, The Netherlands, Italy, former Yugoslavia, Greece and Japan for 25 years. Typical food patterns were: higher consumption of dairy products in Northern Europe; higher consumption of meat in the U.S.; higher consumption of vegetables, legumes, fish, and wine in Southern Europe; and higher consumption of cereals, soy products, and fish in Japan. When researchers analyzed this data in relation to the risk of death from heart disease, they found that legumes were associated with a whopping 82% reduction in risk!!
A study published in the Archives of Internal Medicine confirms that eating high fiber foods, such as lentils, helps prevent heart disease. Almost 10,000 American adults participated in this study and were followed for 19 years. People eating the most fiber, 21 grams per day, had 12% less coronary heart disease (CHD) and 11% less cardiovascular disease (CVD) compared to those eating the least, 5 grams daily. Those eating the most water-soluble dietary fiber fared even better with a 15% reduction in risk of CHD and a 10% risk reduction in CVD.
Lentils’ contribution to heart health lies not just in their fiber, but in the significant amounts of folate and magnesium these little wonders supply. Folate helps lower levels of homocysteine, an amino acid that is an intermediate product in an important metabolic process called the methylation cycle. When folate (as well as vitamin B6) are around, homocysteine is immediately converted into cysteine or methionine, both of which are benign. When these B vitamins are not available, levels of homocysteine increase in the bloodstream—a bad idea since homocysteine damages artery walls and is considered a serious risk factor for heart disease.

Lentils’ magnesium puts yet another plus in the column of its beneficial cardiovascular effects. Magnesium is Nature’s own calcium channel blocker. When enough magnesium is around, veins and arteries breathe a sigh of relief and relax, which lessens resistance and improves the flow of blood, oxygen and nutrients throughout the body. Studies show that a deficiency of magnesium is not only associated with heart attack but that immediately following a heart attack, lack of sufficient magnesium promotes free radical injury to the heart. Want to literally keep your heart happy? Eat lentils.

Lentils Give You Energy to Burn While Stabilizing Blood Sugar
In addition to its beneficial effects on the digestive system and the heart, soluble fiber helps stabilize blood sugar levels. If you have insulin resistance, hypoglycemia or diabetes, legumes like lentils can really help you balance blood sugar levels while providing steady, slow-burning energy. Studies of high fiber diets and blood sugar levels have shown the dramatic benefits provided by these high fiber foods. Researchers compared two groups of people with type 2 diabetes who were fed different amounts of high fiber foods. One group ate the standard American Diabetic diet, which contains with 24 grams of fiber/day, while the other group ate a diet containing 50 grams of fiber/day. Those who ate the diet higher in fiber had lower levels of both plasma glucose (blood sugar) and insulin (the hormone that helps blood sugar get into cells). The high fiber group also reduced their total cholesterol by nearly 7%, their triglyceride levels by 10.2% and their VLDL (Very Low Density Lipoprotein—the most dangerous form of cholesterol)levels by 12.5%.

Iron for Energy
In addition to providing slow burning complex carbohydrates, lentils can increase your energy by replenishing your iron stores. Particularly for menstruating women, who are more at risk for iron deficiency, boosting iron stores with lentils is a good idea—especially because, unlike red meat, another source of iron, lentils are not rich in fat and calories. Iron is an integral component of hemoglobin, which transports oxygen from the lungs to all body cells, and is also part of key enzyme systems for energy production and metabolism. And remember: If you’re pregnant or lactating, your needs for iron increase. Growing children and adolescents also have increased needs for iron.
Description

Lentils are legumes, seeds of a plant whose botanical name is Lens ensculenta. They grow in pods that contain either one or two lentil seeds.

Lentils are classified according to whether they are large or small in size with dozens of varieties of each being cultivated. While the most common types in the United States are either green or brown, lentils are also available in black, yellow, red and orange colors. These round, oval or heart-shaped disks are small in size, oftentimes smaller than the tip of a pencil eraser. They are sold whole or split into halves.
The different types offer varying consistencies with the brown and green ones better retaining their shape after cooking, while the others generally become soft and mushy. While the flavor differs slightly among the varieties, they generally feature a hearty dense somewhat nutty flavor.

History
Lentils are believed to have originated in central Asia, having been consumed since prehistoric times. They are one of the first foods to have ever been cultivated. Lentil seeds dating back 8000 years have been found at archeological sites in the Middle East. Lentils were mentioned in the Bible both as the item that Jacob traded to Esau for his birthright and as a part of a bread that was made during the Babylonian captivity of the Jewish people.

For millennia, lentils have been traditionally been eaten with barley and wheat, three foodstuffs that originated in the same regions and spread throughout Africa and Europe during similar migrations and explorations of cultural tribes. Before the 1st century AD, they were introduced into India, a country whose traditional cuisine still bestows high regard for the spiced lentil dish known as dal. In many Catholic countries, lentils have long been used as a staple food during Lent. Currently, the leading commercial producers of lentils include India, Turkey, Canada, China and
Syria.

How to Select and Store
Lentils are generally available in prepackaged containers as well as bulk bins. Just as with any other food that you may purchase in the bulk section, make sure that the bins containing the lentils are covered and that the store has a good product turnover so as to ensure its maximal freshness. Whether purchasing lentils in bulk or in a packaged container, make sure there is no evidence of moisture or insect damage and that the lentils are whole and not cracked.

Canned lentils can be found in some grocery stores and most natural foods markets. Unlike canned vegetables, which have lost much of their nutritional value, there is little difference in the nutritional value of canned lentils and those you cook yourself. Canning lowers vegetables’ nutritional value since they are best lightly cooked for a short period of time, while their canning process requires a long cooking time at high temperatures. On the other hand, beans require a long time to cook whether they are canned or you cook them yourself. Therefore, if enjoying lentils is more convenient for you, by all means go ahead and enjoy them. We would suggest looking for those that do not contain extra salt or additives.

Store lentils in an airtight container in a cool, dry and dark place. Stored this way, they will keep for up to 12 months. If you purchase lentils at different times, store them separately since they may feature varying stages of dryness and therefore will require different cooking times. Cooked lentils will keep fresh in the refrigerator for about three days if placed in a covered container.

Tips for Preparing Lentils:
Lentils can be prepared the day of serving since they do not need to be presoaked. Before washing lentils you should spread them out on a light colored plate or cooking surface to check for, and remove, small stones or debris. After this process, place the lentils in a strainer, and rinse them thoroughly under cool running water.
To boil lentils, use three cups of liquid for each cup of lentils. Lentils placed in already boiling water will be easier to digest than those that were brought to a boil with the water. When the water returns to a boil, turn down the heat to simmer and cover. Green lentils usually take f30 minutes, while red ones require 20 minutes.
These cooking times can be slightly adjusted depending upon the final use. If you are going to be serving lentils in a salad or soup and desire a firmer texture, remove them from the stove top when they have achieved this consistency—typically 5-10 minutes earlier than their usual cooking time. If you are making dal or some preparation that requires a mushier consistency, achieving this texture may take an additional 10-15 minutes.

A Few Quick Serving Ideas:
Combine cooked lentils, and chopped sweet peppers to make a delicious cold salad. Season with your favorite herbs and spices.
Toss buckwheat soba noodles with cooked lentils, small broccoli florets and leeks. Dress with olive oil mixed with garlic and ginger.
Moroccan lentil soup is easy to make. After cooking lentils, add diced vegetables of your choice and season with tamari, coriander, cumin, turmeric and cayenne.

Individual Concerns
Lentils and Purines
Lentils contain naturally-occurring substances called purines. Purines are commonly found in plants, animals, and humans. In some individuals who are susceptible to purine-related problems, excessive intake of these substances can cause health problems. Since purines can be broken down to form uric acid, excess accumulation of purines in the body can lead to excess accumulation of uric acid. The health condition called “gout” and the formation of kidney stones from uric acid are two examples of uric acid-related problems that can be related to excessive intake of purine-containing foods. Yet, recent research has suggested that purines from meat and fish increase risk of gout, while purines from plant foods fail to change the risk.
Lentils are an excellent source of molybdenum and folate. They are a very good source of dietary fiber and manganese and a good source of iron, protein, phosphorus, copper, thiamin and potassium.

All we have to decide is what to do with the time that is given us.
— Gandalf, J.R.R. Tolkien
I’m Alright
Life Less Ordinary

I went to the store and bought some dry beans. Know what I found? They have these little packages of dry beans that have 15 different kinds in one package. Pretty neat.

All we have to decide is what to do with the time that is given us.
— Gandalf, J.R.R. Tolkien
I’m Alright
Life Less Ordinary

this truly is an informative thread!variety-of-beans.jpg

I slow down the pace of my eating and savor the flavor of food.

  • ~
Chickpeas and Most Varieties of Beans-source-link

Kidney, black, pinto and most other varieties of beans contain high amounts of protein per serving.

Chickpeas, also known as garbanzo beans, are another legume with a high protein content.

Both beans and chickpeas contain about 15 grams of protein per cooked cup (240 ml). They are also excellent sources of complex carbs, fiber, iron, folate, phosphorus, potassium, manganese and several beneficial plant compounds (141516Trusted Source).

Moreover, several studies show that a diet rich in beans and other legumes can decrease cholesterol, help control blood sugar levels, lower blood pressure and even reduce belly fat (17Trusted Source18Trusted Source19Trusted Source20Trusted Source).

Add beans to your diet by making a tasty bowl of homemade chili, or enjoy extra health benefits by sprinkling a dash of turmeric on roasted chickpeas (21Trusted Source).

 

Beans.jpg

diabetes-People with type 2 diabetes who ate at least a cup of legumes (beans, chickpeas and lentils) daily for three months had lower blood glucose (blood sugar) levels, as measured by the A1C test, according to a 2012 Canadian study published in the Archivs of Internal Medicine -

from:10 Tips to lower blood sugar/Lifestyle Changes to Help Control Diabetes

By Laurie Sanchez, Lifescript Staff Writer

Published March 16, 2017

- See more at: 9 Tips To Lower Blood Sugar
In response to themadcookieman’s post:

13 bean soup
There are 270 calories in 1 serving of Bob’s Red Mill 13 Bean Soup Mix.
Calorie breakdown: 3% fat, 71% carbs, 26% protein.
13 Bean Soup Mix contains

    • navy
    • black
    • red
    • pinto
    • baby limas
    • large limas
    • garbanzo
    • red lentils
    • great northern
    • kidney beans
    • black-eyed peas
    • yellow splits
    • green splits
    • and lentils.
      This is good hearty soup at its finest, and the different colors are so appetizing. No seasonings are added—
      and if you like they have Bean Soup Seasoning Mix

 

thanks for reminding me Jeff! These are great!

Tour of Bob’s Red Mill
13 bean chili recipe
veggie soup mix
Vegi Soup Mix is absolutely the best soup mix ever put together! “Contains green split peas, yellow split peas, barley, lentils and vegetable pasta (semolina wheat flour, dehydrated spinach and tomato). No seasonings are added—use your favorites or try our Bean Soup Seasoning Mix!”

Here is a review:
The only reason this gets a four and not a five is that it is pretty cheap and easy to just go to your grocer and pick up the beans required to make your own multi-bean soup, then toss them in a Rubbermaid and use them at will. Red Mills, however, has incredibly high quality products, and I confess that when I’m in a rush, or know little about the quality of the food choices before me, I tend toward this brand. I’m picky about the nutritive value of foods, and the way they are grown and processed, and this has been a safe place to go for that.

Making a soup with this particular mix is as easy as falling off a log! If you’re nervous and don’t have a recipe, just cheat the first time out of the gate by tossing in onion soup mix/your favorite homemade broth and some veggies.

Affirmation Quick Searchaffirmation tags
♫Frampton I love enjoying this surrender. It is always beyond my wildest imagination of completion

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